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Groovy English pronunciation activities at Okanagan College Online

Pronunciation was a popular goal in the poll we recently ran on this blog. Okanagan College has hosted this pronunciation site for quite a while, and even though the technology is a little old, the site hard to beat for creative, free, online activities for practicing clarity of specific sounds.

okanagan

Check out the tongue twisters like “It’s the right light with the glimmer in the mirror” or the great “minimal pair” activities such as those at http://international.ouc.bc.ca/pronunciation/minpair07.html, where you can test your listening accuracy to sounds that are very close.

You will need a number of plug-ins to make the site work: Adobe Shockwave, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Acrobat Reader, but there are links to all three on the front webpage. You’ll also need QuickTime for some video content. Sometimes using a different browser can help too. If you can’t get the sound interfaces to work, you can always download the .pdf “workbook” on each sound, which will give you access to almost all content.

Enjoy, and as always, get connected by leaving a comment on this site.

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MICUSPinterface

A Great Academic Writing Resource

Suppose you are writing a paper and you’re trying to refer to one of your sources. You feel like you’ve already used “according to” way too much. You could go to MICUSP, the Michigan Corpus of Undergraduate Student Papers at http://micase.elicorpora.info, for inspiration. This “corpus” (a body of texts) is a searchable collection of dozens of real student papers that received a grade of “A” at the University of Michigan. Try looking up the words according to. You’ll see 835 examples in 365 papers that you can explore by subject, assignment type, and more. As you browse examples, notice what other language is also used to reference sources. Beyond indicating references, what else do you notice about how “according to” is actually used?
Leave a comment here: what did you find useful on/about MICUSP?